About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 78
LANGUAGE
English 78
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)
unpredictable world. >> join us... >> join us... >> as we discuss... >> today's most critical global issues. >> join us... >> join us... >> join us... >> join us... >> for great decisions. >> prepare... >> prepare... >> prepare to discuss >> prepare... >> prepare to discuss the world! [instrumental music] >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. great decisions is produced in association with the university of delaware. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by, price waterhouse coopers llp, the aarp office of international affairs, and the european commission. coming up next, "should america and the european commission. coming up next, "should america give up on haiti?" [instrumental music] >> welcome to great decisions, where americans make tough choices on u.s. foreign policy. i'm ralph begleiter. this week we ask, "should the u.s. give up on haiti?" to help answer this question we'll be joined by great decision participants in dallas and by our experts: ray walser, a senior policy analyst at the heritage fou
intervention in libya diplomatic preure is growing. the u.s., britain and france warned gaddafi to hold the advance and pull back on other cities. this comes on the heels of a decision to propose a no-fly zone. gaddafi has declared a cease- fire but rebels say government forces continued their assault. >> for these rebels the no-fly zone cannot come soon enough. the resolution gives me new hope. >> there for libya has decided on an immediate cease-fire and stoppage of all operations. >> that announcement has been received with skepticism. >> the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls to stop violence against his own people has left us with no other choice. >> the international community will not be tricked by the libyan regime. the international community will verify strict compliance with the resolution. >> at the nato headquarters preparations were made to pave the way for operations to begin this weekend. >> we now havthe power and legal basis to stop. that is
journal," thanks for talking with us. >> my pleasure, ray. more on libya with president obama's speech. we'll be back with that shortly. >> ifill: in a few moments the president will address the nation on american involvement inibya. for those stations just joining us, president obama is speaking from the campus of the national defense university at fort mcnair in washington d.c., ten days after the american military, nato and the arab league began enforcing a no fly zone over libya, the administration is mounting a full-scale defense of an action the president said again today will be limited both in time and scope. newshour political editor david chalian joins me to give us a sense of what the president thinks he needs to accomplish tonight. >> he has to answer three fundamental questions, gwen. he has to answer why are we involved in this military action in libya. he has to say what are the next steps now that we're moving into this support role supposedly going forward? and the third question he has to answer is what if qaddafi stays since he has stated the country's policy as qaddafi
and nato enter libya. >> woodruff: plus we look at military options for the u.s. and others, including establishing a no-fly zone over the north african nation. >> warner: marcia coyle gives us the latest from the supreme court, including today's 8-1 ruling upholding the free speech rights of protesters at military funerals. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the controversy surrounding dozens of no fishing zones off the coast of california. >> california is establishing dozens of protected areas in the ocean, but the problem is there aren't enough game wardens to enforce the rules. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks to libyan-born u.s. poet khaled mattawa about life in libya under qaddafi and today's uprising. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institu
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
. and then it needs help. >>> welc. i'm kim lawton, sitting in for bob abernathy. thank you for joining us. faith based and humanitarian aid groups gearing up to help those on friday. the earthquake was at strongest ever recorded in japan, and one of the largest in the world in the last century. the house committee on homeland security this week held a first in a series of controversial herings emining what it called radicalization in the american muslim community and there was wide religious reaction. the hearing called by chair of committee, new york republican peter king, who invokes the member of the 9/11 attacks. >> we must be fully aware home groan radicalization is apart o al qaeda's strategy to continue attacking the united states. al qaeda is actively targeting the american muslim community for recruitment. today's hearing will addresshe dangerous trend. >> reporter: first step on the witness list was congressman keith ellison a democrat from minnesota and the first muslim elected to the house of representatives. >> it's true that specific individuals, including some who are muslims, are
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
, but they face a daunting task. damage running into some $30 billion u.s. the government says it has already paid compensation to half of those affected by this tsunami. in one area, the situation is better. the city's south of santiago was badly damaged. seven people were killed, and even the city hall in the church were destroyed. but when you're on, the mayor is optimistic. -- one year on. construction work is proceeding at a good pace. >> [speaking foreign language] [translation in german] >> in may year managed to convince a organizations to help with their plans -- the mayor managed to convince aid organizations. again, old materials are being reused. only cla is missing. -- clay is missing. >> the school has been providing help to this area for almost one year. >> [speaking foreign language] . >> the school also found a donor willing to provide two years' worth of health-care supplies for the center. the mayor is visiting a family that will be the first of 700 to get a proper house. i asked why things have not improved faster in this area. >> [speaking foreign language] [translation in ger
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
and if hopefully you find it useful and if so it will allow people who would never have the opportunity to work at the fat duck to learn those techniques, apply in the their own cuisine, maybe take it in a totally different direction. >> rose: richard engel, barney frank, and nathan myhrvold when we continue. every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin with an update on the crisis in libya with richard engel of nbc news. first this, speaking at a joint press conferce in chile, president obama defended the air strikes. >> i think it's very easy to square our military actions and our stated policies. our military action is in support o
>> we're not terrorist suspects. >>> coming up, u.s. muslim groups working to prevent extremism from taking hold in their communities. >> we're not terrorist suspects. we are america's brightest prospects. >>> plus, author mary karr on battling alcoholism and depression, and finding a haven in the roman catholic church. >>> welcome. i'm kim lawton, sitting in for bob abernethy. thank you for joining us. international humanitarian groups raced to help refugees fleeing the violence and chaos in libya this week. more than 200,000 people have arrived at the borders between libya and tunisia and egypt. the international red cross and red crescent societies are leading efforts to provide food, water, and sanitation, as well as medical help for the wounded. islamic relief has deployed teams of doctors and aid workers. and libya's small christian community sought help for people who have taken refuge in churches and church-run facilities. >>> religious and political leaders around the world condemned the assassination of shahbaz bhatti, the only christian to serve in pakistan's cabinet.
launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striking back fro
? >> the part is that says the deal we have between us-- we egypt and you israel-- is that there must be a solution, a fair solution on the palestinian issue. i think... with the u.s. saying whether it was going to have this hijacked or not, whether it's hijacked or not, one thing that is, i think, irreversible is that there is going to be a free press in all these countries. that is irreversible. and that... whatever the government says, that free press is going to demand a better implementation of agreement between israel and the arab countries. i understand that israel is buying egyptian guards cheaper than the egyptian consumer and 40% cheaper than the jordanians. i don't think the egyptians would like to... >> rose: well, there have also been stories that people in gaza were paying a lot more for things that came from israel than the people of israel were paying for them. >> well, that's inside israel, inside the occupation. but the egyptians are going to say how come we sell our goods to a neighbor-- no matter how friendly they are-- than to another neighbor, jordan, or to ourse
civilians." 10 security councilmembers voted yes on the resolution. u.s., u.k., france, bosnia- herzegovina, columbia, garr bon, lebanon, nigeria, portugal, south africa. five members abstained -- russia, china, germany, brazil, india. the 10 votes was just one more than the nine needed for passage. and it did not include input from the 192-member united nations general assembly. but international support for the no-fly zone is now waning. the libyan government is alleging that coalition bombings have killed many civilians. doctors on the ground say over 100 civilians have died. military deaths not included. the 22-member arab league this week accused the u.s. and the coalition of ignoring the u.n. >> as far as we're concerned the arab league, we requested the security council to establish a no-fly zone in order to protect the civilians, in addition to safe areas for the civilians to sit in without attacks on them. >> brazil, russia, india and china, the bric nations, are all calling for an immediate cessation of the no-fly zone. u.s. defense secretary robert gates says it's gaddafi that is
holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grade school. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: in 1968, as whaling continued worldwide, the first recordings of humpback songs were relqb:qb. ( whale singing ) public reaction mud to international bans. whale populations began to recover. at pacific life, the whale symbolizes what is possible if people stop and think about the future. help protect your future with pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. ♪ ♪çç moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates founda
reasons. >> warner: thanks for joining us, sir. tell us, what is the situation right now? >> the situation in zawiya, the boys are in control of all the city since nine days ago. they took over the city and everything under control. >> warner: by the boys, do you mean the rebels? >> we are not rebels. we are not rebels. we don't want to be called rebels. we are revolutionary forces. >> warner: how hard is the government trying to retake your city? >> the last thursday there were a big invasion and 17 people were killed. more than 50 injured. that's a major assault from the forces of... and these forces of the boys of qaddafi. >> what happened last night? we heard they made another major assault. >> since that big assault the government forces seized the city from three sides. from the east, the west, and the south. and they're making our ambushes and assaults. there is killing, but we are under siege now. we are under siege. last night we were certain that if we don't give up they will bombard us by air force. so the reaction of the people, they come out of their homes, women and children
are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three. partial meltdown likely occurred in at least one of the six reactors. the biggest fear is that the molten mass could penetrate the steel hull and release regular active material into the environment. radioactivity levels have fluctuated at the plant. the 50 or so workers remaining inside were temporarily evacuated at one point to protect their health. an attempt to send helicopters in to douse the reactors was broken off. now officials are considering cooling the reactors with water cannons. a spokesman for the japanese government tried to reassure the public, saying radiation in the vicinity posed no immediate danger. bu
strike on a key oil port. investigators in germany believe the fatal gun attack on two u.s. airmen in frankfurt airport was politically motivated. and and ecb interest rate hike is on the horizon as the bank frets over mounting inflation. ♪ >> france and britain say there will support a no-fly zone over libya if the situation there gets worse. the french foreign ministry says the two countries plan to do everything they can to increase pressure on moammar gaddafi. the libyan leader once more airstrikes on the rebels thursday morning. witnesses say warplanes bombed an oil port. the rebels have appealed for outside help, asking for u.n.- backed airstrikes to end the conflict. >> in the battle zone town, rebels are burying the dead. thousands turned out to join the funeral procession. there are mercenaries hired by gaddafi. they're preparing for new attacks on their town, a strategic seaport with key oil facilities, after recent air strikes, a ground attack by gaddafi's troops appears imminent. >> we're ready to face gaddafi's men. our scouts are telling us they are headed this way.
-- the power to help you succeed. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: a key official in moammar qaddafi's government defected today. the foreign minister, moussa koussa, sought refuge in london according to britain's foreign office. on the ground, the momentum shifted again in qaddafi's favor, as government troops reversed the gains rebels made just two days ago. opposition forces retreated east giving up the towns along the way and there were reports of some heading back to the rebel stronghold of benghazi. lindsey hilsum of "independent televison news" reports from the frontlines. >> reporter: the rebels set fire to one of colonel qaddafi's old tanks before fleeing ras lanuf. it
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
on this now. >> right now. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. and by toyota. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: syria was gripped today by a sweeping display of opposition. it brought a deadly response. jeffrey brown has that story. >> brown: the syrian government declared today, "the situation is completely calm in all parts of the country." but amateur video from around the country posted on youtu and elsewhere told a very different story-- even, tonight, in a damascus bazaar. altogether, it marked a major escalation in the unrest, and the strongest challenge to the syrian regime in years. cell phone images from the city of daraa captured scenes of chaos as protesters ducked behind walls
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technolo
, about u.s. involvement in the north african country. >> ifill: then, marcia coyle walks us through today's supreme court arguments in a huge class action suit against wal-mart. >> woodruff: we update the nuclear crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities. >> in angola chevron h
would have an example or know people who were trafficked. and that's what brought us ultimately to odessa. >> narrator: frustrated with an inability to chase the traffickers overseas, the ukrainian secret service has given us a tip about a suspected sex trader who regularly brings girls through here. across from the port, on the famous odessa steps, we secretly film as she traffics young women to turkey. we've been asked to call her olga. >> the secret service said that she runs a legitimate business as a cover, and she basically takes women from moldova and ukraine to work as domestics in turkey. and amongst these women are some younger women who she sells to traffickers and pimps in turkey. we wanted to answer some fundamental questions, like why don't these women run away, and how do they get across borders, and how do they get kidnapped, and how could they really be enslaved, in... you know, at this point in history? >> sex trafficking only started with the fall of the soviet union when the borders opened up and it became much easier for traffickers to find desperate girls,
. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's
coast. >> ifill: and in a speech to the nation tonight, president obama defends u.s. involvement. >> brown: plus, we update the spiraling nuclear crisis in japan, where new radiation levels have been found in the air, seawater, and soil around the fukushima plant. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to marcia coyle about today's supreme court free speech arguments involving a campaign finance law in arizona. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for morehan 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and relax? your financial professional can tell you about pacific life, the power to help you succeed. >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. chevron. we may have more in common than you think. and by bnsf railway. and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the id
think the one message-- and it's not the u.s., it's anyone who could speak to the syrians-- is to say the threshold not to be crossed is the use of indiscriminate violence against peaceful protesters. that's the threshold. we can be very disappointed about the lack of reform and that's a judgment the syrian people are going to have to make but in terms of the use of force against peaceful protesters, that's when i speak about kinsy and that i think should be the message. >> i agree. >> simon: we conclude with a conversation charlie taped recently with linda wells, the editor in chief of "allure" magazine. >> to do the magazine in the last 20 years is better than if we picked any other time-- not that we could have-- if we pick any other time in the past 20 years. more has chked now in the past 20 years, in terms of products, attitudes, in terms of the visual name of our culture and in terms of the acceptance of beauty and in terms of all the controversy attached to it-- plastic surgery and doing too much and anorexia and aging. there are all these subjects that are really vital. so th
. on the "newshour" tonight: we update the military operation and get two views on what the u.s. and its allies can do to stop moammar qaddafi's forces. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to the editor of the yemen times about the growing protests in that arab nation. >> they want a life where they don't have to think of future and be equal. >> brown: paul solman has the story of the widening gap in american society between the very rich and the rest of the country. >> the top 1% is living well, and they don't get it. they don't get what is happening to this country and i feel like we're creating a third world country subculture within this country. >> lehrer: and ray suarez looks at new census numbers showing one in six americans is hispanic. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more we
, the military has used wear from firefighters to cool reactors. the ieae says it has stabilized, but it could still worsen. the security council is voting on libya as the gaddafi forces push into rebel-held territory. the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog says efforts made by japan to cool reactor it's and fuel rods at the fukushima power plant have stabilized the situation but warning it could deteriorate. engineers have worked through the night to install a power line for water pumps needed to cool two reactors and a storage site for spent nuclear fuel rods. helicopters have also been dumping water on overheating reactors to stave off a meltdown. fire trucks have also joined in the effort. >> japan has been pinning a lot of its hopes on these trucks. they can get within 80 meters of the reactor. the trucks have repeatedly doused the pool with water as shown in this graphic from japanese tv. authorities were guarded about the operation's success. some reports say radiation levels have risen since it began. an airborne aspect was part of the plan. military helicopters dumped water on the facility, but
that will cost us billions of dollars. >> first anniversary of the health-care law. >> a year later, it looks worse than it did then and that is saying something. >> i may be 5'2" and wearing a yellow suit but i am one tough lady. >> we the people will take back our government. >> and what is going on at reagan national airport? >> the tower is apparently unmanned. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> they are not exactly pen ls, but house speaker john boehner wrote a letter to president obama. he has questions, he said, about the american role in libya, our strategy there, the cost, the operation, gaddafi, whether he stays or goes. all these concerns point to a fundamental question -- what is our benchmark for success in libya? how'd you think the president would answer that, evan? >> i wish heheould tell us. i often wonder if obama knows. maybe he doesn't have an answer. basically, our policy is to get rid of gaddafi, because if we don't, he is going to attack the united states. this is a scary, a crazy guy. i worry about domestic terrorism if we don't get ri
fighting in eastern libya with rebel forces using rocket launchers and take missiles, all of the artillery that they have to stop the advance of government forces. rebels have little defense against the air strikes. plumes of smoke in the distance mark bombardments. reports that a huge oil facility was the amount of the targets. government troops have claimed advances on several fronts in the east and west of tripoli. the initial euphoria amongst the rebels appears to have given way to the sobering reality that the regime will not be toppled as easily as those in neighboring countries. >> there appears to be a plot against libya. a determination to take control of libya and steal its oil. then the libyan people will take up arms against them. in the rebel-held switch -- city of benghazi, people took to the streets to demonstrate for intervention. it wanted the international community to impose a no-fly zone over libya. to stop the air strikes against their own people. let's i spoke to the correspondent in the east of the country and asked him how important a no-fly zone would be. >> fighte
fire earlier in the day. also today the u.s. navy moved some of its ships to the western side of japan away from the drift of radiation. and the rising risk of exposure touched off new fears in people still shaken by the quake and tsunami. alex thomson reports from the town of ofunato, up the coast from sendai. >> reporter: every day across the quake zone the cues for food, water and petrol are getting longer and longer. >> we just want to stay away. >> reporter: now fears over radiation mean hurried plans from some to leave town. >> let's make a base here. >> reporter: today our business lay to the north. they've just managed to blast away in, bull dozing away the tsunami's wake. a place utterly surrendered to the tsunami. japan's rising sun flag in tatters on this cold sunless day. a force which would pulverize the heavy lift digger somehow leaves intact the sign pointing people to the tsunami shelter. i don't doubt that it was a place of refuge for many during those terrifying moments last friday afternoon. if they survived they can look down now on this industrial sector of their t
. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. faith-based and international aid groups rushed to help victims of the catastrophes in japan. it's estimated that more than 10,000 people were killed by the massive earthquake and tsunami. japanese officials say more than 450,000 are homeless and in need of supplies. humanitarian efforts, however, have been severely complicated by radiation from four of the country's nuclear reactors. we get more from dave toycen, the president and chief executive officer of the christian aid group, world vision canada. we spoke to him by phone from tokyo on friday night. dave, thanks so much for staying upo late to talk to us. are you and the others doing relief work there, are you able to get to all the people who need help? and do you have the supplies you need to help them? >> well, basically we do. we're anticipating we'll be raising somewhere between $10 million and $20 million. so our team here has already spent, you know, a chunk of that because they know it's coming. but of course, we believe we're gonna be able to raise that amount of mon
says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victo, denouncinghat he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for control in eastern libya, where thehave been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention w
bush. in a statement today, president obama said buckles' life "reminds us of the true meaning of patriotism." those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: the threat of a government shutdown appears to have eased for now as a republican-backed proposal picked up some democratic support. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman has our update. >> reporter: with current funding for federal operations set to run out at midnight friday, congressional leaders seemed to be coalescing around a short term measure that would avert a shutdown. the proposal released friday by house republicans would keep the government running another two weeks but would cut $4 billion in spending. including $2.7 billion from nearly 50 earmarks spending directed by lawmakers to home state projects. $650 million in federal highway funds and $368 million spread across four department of education programs. congressional democrats initially balked at the new republican proposal, but some warmed to it once it became clear reductions would come from cuts already included in
makers. >> in man who shot two u.s. servicemen was acting alone in frankfurt. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> muammar gaddafi's forces are fighting rebels on several fronts. in the west security forces launched an offensive to retake one town. in tripoli, protesters took to the streets calling for the end of muammar gaddafi's rule. there have been no reports of injuries. heavily armed rebels clashed with muammar gaddafi's fors elsewhere. the head of the rebel council says the fighting will not stop until the opposition liberates the entire country. the rebels are preparing to march on tripoli. >> rebels under fire from khadafi = = -- gaddafi loyalists. this man screams he wants to murder his own people. this is the site of a key oil terminal. rebels fired a sustained brian shaw of artillery in an attempt to overrun a military base. fighting was also reported 200 kilometers to the east. loyalist forces are taking a position outside one city. rebels are manning anti-aircraft guns around the clock. >> we have had enough. we want progress and not a corru
provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> lehrer: this was another day of fierce fighting in libya. forces loyal to moammar qaddafi used tanks and sniper fire to prs their assault zawiyah, outside tripoli. doctors reported at least 40 people killed in the latest fighting. meanwhile, qaddafi again rejected any attempt at outside intervention. we have two reports from "independent television news," beginning with jonathan rugman, in tripoli. >> reporter: this was state television's sanitized version of zawiyah's outskirts today. peace and tranquility are returning after zawiyah was freed from al qaedalinked gangs, the channel said. a reporter interviewed qaddafi's fighters, all dresse
for al qaeda but also a quiet u.s. ally in the fight against terrorism. now, its ruler of more than 30 years is under pressure from demonstrators, his generals, and diplomats to step aside. for more, we turn to christopher boucek, an associate in the middle east program of the carnegie endowment for international peace, and a frequent visitor to yemen. do these defections, regular resignation represent a real turning point in the strugate of the opposition against the president of yemen. >> a week ago i would have said no but i think there's a cumulative effect. what we're seeing today with the large number of foreign ambassadors that have resigned there's a cumulative effect. it shows decreasing support for the president and the regime. >> suarez: at the same time as major general resigned and took his armored division to key sights in the capital, other high-ranking generals declared their allegiance to the president. does this bring yemen one step closer to civil war? >> i think there's always been a real concern thatiolence could escalate. you'd have an unintended escalation of vio
? where is great britain? they should help us. they should be giving us weapons or stopping gaddafi forces from advancing on us. >> they say they will not be sending in ground forces. germany is especially opposed to the idea. foreign minister has offered humanitarian help. >> delegatesagreed that gaddafi has to go but what should happen to him if he leaves power? italy has proposed exile while france, the u.s., and britain want to see him put before the international criminal court. the british hosts of the conference, however, have been stressing points of unity. >> the participants have affirmed the importance of full and swift implementation of the security council resolutions and our strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, territorial integrity, and national unity of libya. we will be pursuing additional sanctions on individuals and entities associated with the regime. >> delegates say the ongoing airstrikes against the gaddafi regime are just a first at which must be followed by political process. they have agreed to set up an international contact group to decide which c
that the arab states will be alienated if nato led the mission. but the u.s., italy, and britain have been pushing for nato to take over the operation. william hayes said that a unified command is necessary -- william hague said that a unified command is necessary. eanwhile, rebel fors in lib's third largest city say they have killed 30 loyalists snipers. troops loyal to gaddafi have been in the hospital. there are also reports of heavy fighting in northern east. >> more and more civilians are leading the stern -- are leading the eastern town as heavy gunfire continues between troops and rebels. >> this situation is getting worse and worse. god will punish those who are responsible for this. >> on thursday, libyan state tv showed footage of damage caused by overnight air strikes. officials say that a western bombs destroyed a military base in tripoli. france has since confirmed that dozens of coalition planes were indeed in operation over the country. libyan tv also showed injured people being admitted to hospital. libyan authorities said that 18 people were killed in the strikes, soldiers
demanding he stop killing. nato is still wrangling or who should run the campaign after the u.s. steps back. president obama and france's nicholas sarkozy have a and currently come to an agreement over how france should participate in the mission, but no word yet on when france will be taking over. one thing that has been agreed upon is that the arms embargo must be enforced. >> nato has committed to enforcing the arms embargo by air and by sea. hips and aircraft will patrol the air and coastal waters in an attempt to stem the mercenaries joining the gaddafi regime. rebels are hoping this will even the playing field against the dictator superior military might. but german foreign minister is calling for yet more wide reaching sanctions. >> we are working for an all out oil and gas embargo. it cannot be that at the same time military air strikes are being flown, the possibility of contious gas and oil deals with the gaddafi rajeev have not been completely cut rolled out. -- gaddafi regime have not been completely ruled out. >> this video footage shows a harbor aimed at taking out in 80 days.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 78 (some duplicates have been removed)